Drawing by Chloe Machida for Year of the Boar Nengajo

Nengajo – Welcome to the “Year of the Boar” (part I)

The artwork on the next three pages are the winning entries in the annual nengajö, or New Year’s card, design contest, sponsored by the Hawai‘i Association of Teachers of Japanese. It is a statewide competition for students learning Japanese language and is open to elementary, middle, high school and college students whose teachers are HATJ....
Drawing by Kaya Smith for Year of the Boar Nengajo

Nengajo – Welcome the “Year of the Boar” (part II)

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Drawing by Katelyn Higashiya for Year of the Boar Nengajo

Nengajo – Welcome the “Year of the Boar” (part III)

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Drawing by Kira Alipio for Year of the Boar Nengajo

Nengajo – Welcome the “Year of the Boar” (part IV)

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Porchetta di testa. (Photos by Ryan Tatsumoto)

Ryan’s Table – In Praise of Porcine

Ryan Tatsumoto Hawai‘i Herald Columnist The Japanese celebrated the “Year of the Boar” earlier this week. In a little over a month, however, the rest of Asia will celebrate the “Year of the Pig.” So, to be all-inclusive, let’s just say that 2019 is the “Year of the Porcine.” No matter that they are the....
Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shöken, are featured in this print by Hashimoto Chikanobu (1838-1912). It commemorates the first time a Japanese emperor attended a kabuki play and was publicized in order to help resuscitate the art of kabuki, which, along with other traditional arts, was dying due to rapid Westernization. (Courtesy Honolulu Museum of Arts, Anonymous gift)

Art Review – Changing Times

Exhibit Celebrates 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration and Immigration to Hawai‘i Wayne Muromoto Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald In the “I Ching,” there is a popular canard, or myth: In crisis or change, there is opportunity. This is based on a false and superficial reading of the Chinese characters, or hanji (in Japanese:....
Irene Hirano Inouye

Gannenmono Symposium Keynote – Irene Hirano Inouye

"Like the Gannenmono . . . Be Bold and Adventurous As We Chart New Pathways Forward" Irene Hirano Inouye Published with Permission Aloha . . . I am very pleased to join the distinguished speakers and special guests at this historic Gannenmono commemoration. We are especially honored that Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Akishino....
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano

Gannenmono Symposium – Akemi Kikumura, Yano, PH.D.

"Why Hawaii's and the U.S. Mainland's Immigration Experiences Were So Different" Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano Published with Permission How did the Mainland experience of Japanese immigrants and, subsequently, Japanese Americans, compare with that of the Gannenmono and later generations of Japanese in Hawai‘i? This is a question I am frequently asked and one that I....
Professor Masako Iino

Gannenmono Symposium – Masako Iino, PH.D.

"Gannenmono Spirit and Hawaii-Japan Relations" Professor Masako Iino Published with Permission Hawai‘i is one of the most popular destinations for Japanese tourists. When they fly into Honolulu, the first thing they notice is that the airport has a name: the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. He was the first Japanese American to serve in the....

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