The “Family Ingredients” crew with Chef Jiro Ono outside his Tökyö restaurant: Kneeling, from left: Chef Ed Kenney, producer Dan Nakasone, cinematographer Todd Fink, director Ty Sanga and Chef Alan Wong. Back row, from left: director of photography Renea Veneri Stewart, executive producer Heather Giugni, Jiro’s apprentices in whites with chefs Jiro-san and Yoshikazu-san (fifth and sixth from left), Japan coordinator Nancy Singleton Hachisu and Leigh Ito, vice president, Alan Wong’s Restaurants. Missing from photo: sound engineer John Saimo. (Photos courtesy Dan Nakasone)

Lead Story – Living Food Memories

Behind the Scenes of the Award-winning "Family Ingredients" Dan Nakasone Special to The Hawai‘i Herald They migrated to Hawai‘i from all corners of the world. They bid farewell to family, friends and the place they called home, knowing they might never return. To describe this upheaval as unsettling is a gross understatement. But the cultural....
Rick Hoo creates a kadomatsu using mosotake, or green bamboo. (Photos courtesy of Kuhio Lions Club of Honolulu)

Lead Story – Kadomatsu and Cultural Identity

S. Sanae (Imada) Tokumura Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Got kadomatsu, or kadomatsu plans? If not, there’s still time to gather the essential pine boughs and other symbolic elements to create Hawai‘i’s essential New Year’s decoration. Kadomatsu, literally “gate pine,” is originally a Shintö practice, but placing kadomatsu outside homes and/or businesses is largely no....
Governor David Ige getting sworn in for his 2nd term as Hawaii's Governor

Lead Story – David Ige Begins Second Term as Hawaii’s Governor

Gov. David Y. Ige (Photos by Jodie Chiemi Ching) Good morning and aloha. First, I would like to thank the people of Hawai‘i for electing me to another term as your governor. I find myself eager and excited about the prospect of tackling all that is before us. And I look forward to working with....
Journalist and community activist Gary T. Kubota spent three years conducting oral history interviews with over 30 people who were arrested or involved in protesting the 1971 eviction of residents in Kalama Valley for the book, “Hawaii Stories of Change.” The incident is described as the defining moment in the Hawaiian Renaissance. The protests were organized by Kokua Hawaii, a group of community activists. (Photo by Gregg K. Kakesako)

“Hawaii Stories of Change”

Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Nearly half a century ago, 32 people were arrested while protesting the mass eviction of Kalama Valley residents, including farmers and native Hawaiians, by landowner Bishop Estate to pave the way for suburban development in East O‘ahu. Among those arrested was community and anti-Vietnam War activist —....
Cover of November 2, 2018 Hawaii Herald Issue, '38th Hawaii International Film Festival'

Lead Story – HIFF 38 Is Coming to Town!

November is the month film lovers in Hawai‘i look forward to with great anticipation. That’s because the curtain will rise once again on the Hawaii International Film Festival. It’s an opportunity to take in films that bridge East and West and the rest of the world through cinematic storytelling. HIFF 38 — the Hawaii International....
Ron Mizutani, President and CEO of Hawaii Food Bank, along side a young girl, storing bags of food on a flat bed

Lead Story – ” … My Turn to Give Back”

Hawaii Foodbank President Ron Mizutani Comes Full Circle Jodie Chiemi Ching This past April’s devastating floods forced residents of Kaua‘i’s North Shore to once again muster their inner strength and power through the crisis. It was almost a repeat of September 1992, when Hurricane ‘Iniki, a category 4 storm, came ashore on the Garden Island,....
Singer Karen Keawehawaii sings “Kawa no Nagare no Youni” as the hula halau, Ka Lä ‘Önohi Mai O Ha‘e Ha‘e, dance hula to the song. The hula was choreographed by her daughter Tracie and her husband, Keawe Lopes, both of whom are kumu hula. (Photo courtesy Karen Keawehawai‘i)

Lead Story – Memories of Misora Hibari

And the Power of Hibari’s Classic “Kawa no Nagare no Youni” Jodie Chiemi Ching Hawai‘i’s enthusiasm for Japanese popular music started after World War II. “By 1950, nisei orchestras were flourishing and performing to enthusiastic Japanese American audiences. These orchestras whetted the appetite for Japanese popular entertainment that was cautious at first and grew with....
Gov. David Ige joined the organizers of Sacred Heart Village at the June 30 opening. From left: Terry Cabalar of Terry’s Custom Flooring; Brandee Menino, CEO of Hope Services Hawaii; Gov. Ige; Gilbert Aguinaldo of Big Island Electrical and Pacific Rim Construction; Bronson Haunga from Haunga Construction; Darryl Oliveira, safety and internal control manager for HPM; and Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard.

Lead Story – “My Boy, He Will Be a Good Man”

An Immigrant’s Dream is Realized Frances Kakugawa and Karleen Chinen Editor’s note: As most of you know, Frances Kakugawa, The Hawai‘i Herald’s “Dear Frances” columnist, was born in Kapoho on Hawai‘i Island, where she spent her early childhood. The eruption of Kïlauea Volcano in 1955 forced her family to relocate to nearby Pähoa, where they....
Jodie Ching practices with Chikako Shimamura-Sensei. (Photo by June Uyeunten)

Lead Story – My Yushu-Sho Journey

Mission Accomplished, Thanks to My Big Village Jodie Chiemi Ching It was about a year ago that I decided to take on the challenge of earning my Yüshü-shö certification in classical Okinawan uta-sanshin, the art of singing and playing the three-stringed sanshin instrument simultaneously. Yüshü-shö is the second of three major certifications — Shinjin-shö being....

Lead Story – Okinawan Festival, Still Thinking Big

Hawai‘i’s Largest Ethnic Festival is Moving to the Hawai‘i Convention Center Gregg Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The birth of the state’s largest ethnic festival — the Okinawan Festival — on Labor Day weekend can be traced to 1980 and a concerted effort by a group of Sansei Uchinanchu leaders to perpetuate and share....

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