Moloka‘i’s Renaissance Man

Alan Suemori Vol. 15, No. 18, Sept. 23, 1994 In Masashi Otsuka’s dream, he is 14 years old again, rocketing across the uplands of Moloka‘i, his ears filled with the pounding of his heart and the...

Picture Brides: A Story Of “Gaman”

Karleen Chinen Vol. 7, No. 3, Feb. 7, 1986 As Barbara Kawakami listened to the experiences of the Japanese and Okinawan picture brides who came to Hawaii between 1908 and 1924, memories of her own life...
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Omega Plus One

About 17 years ago, the University of Hawaii issued a public statement to the effect that the number one problem on the Manoa campus was the apparent fear, reluctance or inability on the part...

Come To My House

Arnold T. Hiura Vol. 19. No. 1, Jan. 2, 1998 Kapakahi. vs. One-sided, crooked, lopsided, sideways; bent, askew; biased, partial to one side; to show favoritism. Lit., one side. It was an intensely passionate time. A time...
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Generation Gap

GENERATION GAP By Jon J. Murakami

OTA Camp Is People

Editor’s note: This story by Gail Miyasaki was published during Hawaii Hochi’s first effort to launch a Japanese American community publication. The editor was James Brown, who later became the Hawaii Hochi’s English editor;...

Toshi: The Search For Perfection

If you go to the former exhibit area on the second floor of George Hall on the University of Hawaii campus, you will see them — the large wedge and circles, all made of...

Project Dana, Jolene Kim Gerell Receive Ho‘omenemene Award

The Samaritan Counseling Center Hawaii presented its 2016 Ho‘omenemene Award to Project Dana and the late Jolene Kim Gerell at its awards banquet on May 1 at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. The dinner...
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Kapakahi

Arnold T. Hiura Vol. 18, No. 10, May 16, 1997 Kapakahi. vs. One-sided, crooked, lopsided, sideways; bent, askew; biased, partial to one side; to show favoritism. Lit., one side. One needn’t look very far these days for...

Recording The Story Of Hawaii’s People

Lorraine Oda Vol. 4, No. 18, Sept. 16, 1983 Until the Ethnic Studies Oral History Project sought them out, Edith Yonenaka, Charlie Santos, Yuzuru Morita, Ernest Malterre and Raku Morimoto considered themselves ordinary working people. But...

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