Maui architect Jim Niess said artist Kirk Kurokawa painted the mural walls like their black and white original photographs, adding “a subtle touch to its powerful imagery, giving the mural a true sense of integrity and connection to the past.” (Photo by Melissa Tanji)

Herald Salutes – Historic Hawaii Foundation to Honor NVMC Mural Wall

The Historic Hawai‘i Foundation will present a Preservation Award to the Nisei Veterans Memorial Center and Maui artist Kirk Kurokawa for the mural wall he produced for the center. Kurokawa painted the larger-than-life mural wall using ordinary house paint. His work on the mural was featured in a story by contributing writer Melissa Tanji in....
Clement Hanami, Vice President of exhibits and art director for the Japanese American National Museum in a reconstructed barracks building from the Heart Mountain Relocation Camp in Wyoming. The structure was reconstructed in the museum building.

Living History – Los Angeles’ Historic Little Tokyo

An American Story is Being Told Daily in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo District Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald As the summer sky slowly turned a shade of pale orange, the near-capacity crowd of 58,000 in Dodger Stadium saluted a 94-year-old American veteran of Japanese and Hispanic ancestries who served in the 442nd....
Photo from 'Voices behind barbed wire: stories of Hawaii' promoting free screening by AARP Hawaii at the JCCH

“Voices Behind Barbed Wire: Stories of Hawaii” Screening

WHO/WHAT: AARP Hawai‘i will host a free screening of “Voices Behind Barbed Wire: Stories of Hawai‘i,” produced by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. While the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans on the U.S....
Professor Masako Iino

Gannenmono Symposium – Masako Iino, PH.D.

"Gannenmono Spirit and Hawaii-Japan Relations" Professor Masako Iino Published with Permission Hawai‘i is one of the most popular destinations for Japanese tourists. When they fly into Honolulu, the first thing they notice is that the airport has a name: the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. He was the first Japanese American to serve in the....
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shöken, are featured in this print by Hashimoto Chikanobu (1838-1912). It commemorates the first time a Japanese emperor attended a kabuki play and was publicized in order to help resuscitate the art of kabuki, which, along with other traditional arts, was dying due to rapid Westernization. (Courtesy Honolulu Museum of Arts, Anonymous gift)

Art Review – Changing Times

Exhibit Celebrates 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration and Immigration to Hawai‘i Wayne Muromoto Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald In the “I Ching,” there is a popular canard, or myth: In crisis or change, there is opportunity. This is based on a false and superficial reading of the Chinese characters, or hanji (in Japanese:....
Irene Hirano Inouye

Gannenmono Symposium Keynote – Irene Hirano Inouye

"Like the Gannenmono . . . Be Bold and Adventurous As We Chart New Pathways Forward" Irene Hirano Inouye Published with Permission Aloha . . . I am very pleased to join the distinguished speakers and special guests at this historic Gannenmono commemoration. We are especially honored that Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Akishino....
The Hawaii Herald Logo

Moananuiakea: One Ocean, One People, One Canoe

WHO/WHAT: Hawai‘i Public Radio will host a special screening of “Moananuiäkea: One Ocean, One People, One Canoe,” which celebrates the Polynesian voyaging canoe  Hōkūle‘a’s worldwide voyage that connected people and cultures from around the...
Dr. Michael Chun (Courtesy Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate)

Gannenmono Symposium – Michael Chun, PH.D.

"Two Cultures, One People" Michael Chun, Ph.D. Published with Permission Aloha mai käkou! Being a part of today’s symposium commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Gannenmono’s arrival in Hawai‘i is both a great honor and deeply humbling. Mahalo nui loa. With the arrival of the Gannenmono in Hawai‘i in 1868, a new journey was launched....
Only recently did Dan Nakasone learn that the parents of his mother, Masae Miyasato Nakasone, had emigrated from Aza Yogi, Okinawa. (Photo courtesy of Dan Nakasone)

Genealogy – Finding Your Uchinanchu Roots

The Okinawan Genealogical Society of Hawaii Helps Family Tree Branches Come to Life Dan Nakasone Special to The Hawai‘i Herald What school you went?” is a common question heard in Hawai‘i when meeting a fellow “local” for the first time. That question is usually followed by, “What year you grad?” and “You know so-and-so?” In....

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