Nearly 60 descendants — third, fourth, fifth and even sixth generations — of Gannenmono Tokujiro Sasaki Sato gathered at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i earlier this year to celebrate their Gannenmono roots. (Photo by Carole Hayashino)

Gannenmono Descendants – Danny Kamekona Traces Roots To Gannenmono

Arnold T. Hiura Reprinted from Nov. 1, 1985, Hawai‘i Herald Editor’s note: Had he not died unexpectedly in 1996 at the still-young age of 60, you can be sure that actor Danny Kamekona would have joined his huge ‘ohana at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i earlier this year to commemorate the arrival 150 years....
Illustration by Arthur Kodani - of voter booths with callout bubble reading "AJA?"

Politics – “The Japanese Vote”

How Significant is “The Japanese Vote?” Richard Borreca Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Asking about ethnic voting in Hawai‘i is like posing the question: “Is it raining in Hawai‘i?” Yes, somewhere in Hawai‘i almost every day, rain is falling and, yes, Hawai‘i voters take ethnicity into consideration when they go to the polls. But it....
Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko plant a rainbow shower tree at Thomas Square following a luncheon at the Honolulu Museum of Art hosted by Mayor Kirk Caldwell and his wife Donna Tanoue. The tree planting commemorated the 150th anniversary of the Gannenmono's arrival in Hawaii in 1868.

Gannenmono – A Chance to “Reflect Upon the Relationships Between Japan and Hawaii”

Japan’s Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko Reflect on Their Hawai‘i Gannenmono Visit Editor’s note: The following essay, written by Their Imperial Highnesses Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, was emailed to The Hawai‘i Herald and other news organizations by deputy consul general Takayuki Shinozawa of the Japanese Consulate in Honolulu. After returning to Japan, the couple....
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
Group photo of Governor Hidehiko Yuzaki and participants in the Hiroshima International Youth Exchange Program

Spotlight – Hiroshima Governor Joins East Hawaii Hiroshima Kenjinkai’s 50th Anniversary Celebration

The East Hawaii Hiroshima Kenjinkai celebrated its 50th anniversary on May 8 and 9 with members and special guests from Hiroshima Prefecture in attendance, including Gov. Hidehiko Yuzaki, Assembly Chairman Shin Uda, and delegation leader and Assembly member Masao Hayashi. The delegation’s visit included participation in an anniversary dinner; a tree planting ceremony at Lili‘uokalani....

Book on “Sugihara Survivors” Published in English

TÖKYÖ — A former official of the Japan National Tourism Organization has released an English-language version of his research on the wartime escape of Jews from Nazi persecution via Japan. Akira Kitade, 70, published his...
In 2014, Army investigators sift through the remains of what was a prisoner of war camp at Schofield Barracks from 1944 to 1945. (U.S. Army photo)

History – Footprint of Hawaii’s Italian POW’s

The Little-Known Story of the Landmarks Left by World War II Italian Prisoners of War Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald During World War II, some 3,000 Okinawan soldiers, conscripts and civilians were imprisoned in Hawai‘i as prisoners of war. Twelve of them died while in captivity here in Hawai‘i and were buried....
Art items that Haru Tanaka created in camp

In Their Own Words – “But I Believed in America”, The Voice of Haru...

Gail Honda Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The following interview write-up is the third of seven that will be published in The Hawai‘i Herald this year. It is part of a series titled, “In Their Own Words.” In the spring of 1980, I had the opportunity to interview seven former internees of Honouliuli Internment Camp....
An essay on Thanksgiving hand-written by Haru Tanaka.

Sidebar – Kansha-Sai (Thanksgiving)

When Puritans from England aboard the ship Mayflower docked at Plymouth in Massachusetts, it was a very cold winter day. Yet, they overcame many hardships and cut trees; tilled the soil; sowed seeds of corn, beans and potato. That year, the weather was bad, with rainfall and snowstorms causing budding crops to wither away.
Washington Place, the official residence of Hawaii's governor. (Photo courtesy Washington Place Foundation)

Behind the Curtain – “Lefty” Shimabuku Remembers the Burns Family

Jodie Chiemi Ching Neatly displayed in the home of Hozen “Lefty” Shimabuku are precious mementos of the 32 years (1966 to 1998) he worked as a Washington Place groundskeeper, serving four Hawai‘i governors — John A. Burns, George R. Ariyoshi, John D. Waihe‘e III and Benjamin J. Cayetano. That’s a lot of memories. But the....

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