Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko plant a rainbow shower tree at Thomas Square following a luncheon at the Honolulu Museum of Art hosted by Mayor Kirk Caldwell and his wife Donna Tanoue. The tree planting commemorated the 150th anniversary of the Gannenmono's arrival in Hawaii in 1868.

Gannenmono – A Chance to “Reflect Upon the Relationships Between Japan and Hawaii”

Japan’s Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko Reflect on Their Hawai‘i Gannenmono Visit Editor’s note: The following essay, written by Their Imperial Highnesses Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko, was emailed to The Hawai‘i Herald and other news organizations by deputy consul general Takayuki Shinozawa of the Japanese Consulate in Honolulu. After returning to Japan, the couple....
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To Learn More About the Gannenmono

June 5–Feb. 24, 2019: “Gannenmono: A Legacy of Eight Generations in Hawai‘i” exhibit. This exhibit features historic documents and illustrations, cultural objects and first-hand accounts of the Gannenmono. The exhibit also includes the genealogy of one Gannenmono whose family today spans eight generations and contains more than 800 names. Picture Gallery in Hawaiian Hall at....
Group photo of Professor Eric Yamamoto with event sponsors - (from left) Mei-Fei Kuo, attorney and president of the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association, Hawai‘i; Lt. Gov. Doug Chin; Claire Wong Black, attorney and president of the Federal Bar Association; and Liann Ebesugawa, attorney and past president of the Japanese American Citizens League, Honolulu. (Photo courtesy Eric Yamamoto)

Lead Story – Still-Relevant Lessons from Korematsu

UH Law School Professor Eric Yamamoto Examines Those Lessons His New Book, “In the Shadow of Korematsu” Alan Suemori Special to The Hawai‘i Herald To many of us, we are living in an America that today appears increasingly unrecognizable. As our nation makes a hard turn to the right, we are voyaging through the shadow....
Illustration by Arthur Kodani - of voter booths with callout bubble reading "AJA?"

Politics – “The Japanese Vote”

How Significant is “The Japanese Vote?” Richard Borreca Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Asking about ethnic voting in Hawai‘i is like posing the question: “Is it raining in Hawai‘i?” Yes, somewhere in Hawai‘i almost every day, rain is falling and, yes, Hawai‘i voters take ethnicity into consideration when they go to the polls. But it....
Professor Jonathan Okamura contends that serious legal questions can be raised about Myles Fukunaga’s sanity at the time he murdered young Gill Jamieson. (Courtesy Oahu Community Correctional Center)

History – Raced to Death: The Case of Myles Fukunaga

A Look Back on the Case That Rocked the AJA Community 90 Years Ago Jonathan Y. Okamura Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald This year — Sept. 18, to be exact — marks 90 years since Myles Yutaka Fukunaga, a 19-year-old Nisei, killed Gill Jamieson, a 10-year-old Punahou student in Waikïkï. In a highly publicized....
After arriving in Honolulu on June 4 for the Gannenmono 150th anniversary commemoration, Prince Akishino and Princess Kiko paid their respects at the Gannenmono memorial at Makiki Cemetery. (Photo by Richard Borreca)

Gannenmono Literature – O.A. Bushnell Novels Captured Gannenmono Story

The 1970s Novels Brought Gannenmono History to Life Richard Borreca Special to The Hawai‘i Herald It was nearly 60 years ago that the late Hawai‘i writer, historian and scientist, O.A. “Ozzie” Bushnell was challenged by his wife, Elizabeth. As Bushnell’s son Andrew recalled in an interview, a bad play and the ensuing dare launched Bushnell’s literary....
Inset: Richard Blue crafted a special mallet to ring the bell. Blue and his wife Amy often accompanied her father, Tetsuji “Kelly” Tagawa, on visits to the grave of his older brother, Yoriyoshi, who was among the five who died on Haleakalä in 1923.

History – Maui Temple Bell Rekindles Memories of 1923 Tragedy

Melissa Tanji Special to The Hawai‘i Herald After more than 30 years of silence, a temple bell cast in Japan in the 1920s sounded once again last month in Upcountry Maui. It was rung in memory of five young men who died tragically nearly a century ago while on a Good Friday weekend hike to....
Art items that Haru Tanaka created in camp

In Their Own Words – “But I Believed in America”, The Voice of Haru...

Gail Honda Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The following interview write-up is the third of seven that will be published in The Hawai‘i Herald this year. It is part of a series titled, “In Their Own Words.” In the spring of 1980, I had the opportunity to interview seven former internees of Honouliuli Internment Camp....
“. . . I’m interested in preserving memorabilia, preserving the past . . .” says Colin Yamamoto standing beside one of the glass cases containing various antiques and memorabilia.

Preserving Maui’s Yesteryears

For Colin Yamamoto, They are All Historical Treasures Melissa Tanji Special to The Hawai‘i Herald A seat belt from Aloha Airlines Flight 243, a car speaker from the old Kahului Drive-In, plantation kaukau tins, handmade potato peelers and vegetable graters from the 1930s and ’40s. These pieces from Maui’s past are just a fraction of....
Artist Holly Young’s statue of the late Patsy Takemoto Mink is draped with lei. (Photos by Kevin Kawamoto)

Community – Patsy T. Mink Monument Evokes Timeless Ideals

Visitors to the Hawai‘i State Library in downtown Honolulu are now greeted by the newly installed monument honoring the late Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color — and the first Asian American woman — to serve in the United States Congress. The Maui-born lawmaker’s decades in public service won her accolades as a....

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