Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shöken, are featured in this print by Hashimoto Chikanobu (1838-1912). It commemorates the first time a Japanese emperor attended a kabuki play and was publicized in order to help resuscitate the art of kabuki, which, along with other traditional arts, was dying due to rapid Westernization. (Courtesy Honolulu Museum of Arts, Anonymous gift)

Art Review – Changing Times

Exhibit Celebrates 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration and Immigration to Hawai‘i Wayne Muromoto Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald In the “I Ching,” there is a popular canard, or myth: In crisis or change, there is opportunity. This is based on a false and superficial reading of the Chinese characters, or hanji (in Japanese:....
Irene Hirano Inouye

Gannenmono Symposium Keynote – Irene Hirano Inouye

"Like the Gannenmono . . . Be Bold and Adventurous As We Chart New Pathways Forward" Irene Hirano Inouye Published with Permission Aloha . . . I am very pleased to join the distinguished speakers and special guests at this historic Gannenmono commemoration. We are especially honored that Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Akishino....
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano

Gannenmono Symposium – Akemi Kikumura, Yano, PH.D.

"Why Hawaii's and the U.S. Mainland's Immigration Experiences Were So Different" Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano Published with Permission How did the Mainland experience of Japanese immigrants and, subsequently, Japanese Americans, compare with that of the Gannenmono and later generations of Japanese in Hawai‘i? This is a question I am frequently asked and one that I....
Professor Masako Iino

Gannenmono Symposium – Masako Iino, PH.D.

"Gannenmono Spirit and Hawaii-Japan Relations" Professor Masako Iino Published with Permission Hawai‘i is one of the most popular destinations for Japanese tourists. When they fly into Honolulu, the first thing they notice is that the airport has a name: the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. He was the first Japanese American to serve in the....
Dr. Michael Chun (Courtesy Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate)

Gannenmono Symposium – Michael Chun, PH.D.

"Two Cultures, One People" Michael Chun, Ph.D. Published with Permission Aloha mai käkou! Being a part of today’s symposium commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Gannenmono’s arrival in Hawai‘i is both a great honor and deeply humbling. Mahalo nui loa. With the arrival of the Gannenmono in Hawai‘i in 1868, a new journey was launched....
Artist Holly Young’s statue of the late Patsy Takemoto Mink is draped with lei. (Photos by Kevin Kawamoto)

Community – Patsy T. Mink Monument Evokes Timeless Ideals

Visitors to the Hawai‘i State Library in downtown Honolulu are now greeted by the newly installed monument honoring the late Patsy Takemoto Mink, the first woman of color — and the first Asian American woman — to serve in the United States Congress. The Maui-born lawmaker’s decades in public service won her accolades as a....
Washington Place, the official residence of Hawaii's governor. (Photo courtesy Washington Place Foundation)

Behind the Curtain – “Lefty” Shimabuku Remembers the Burns Family

Jodie Chiemi Ching Neatly displayed in the home of Hozen “Lefty” Shimabuku are precious mementos of the 32 years (1966 to 1998) he worked as a Washington Place groundskeeper, serving four Hawai‘i governors — John A. Burns, George R. Ariyoshi, John D. Waihe‘e III and Benjamin J. Cayetano. That’s a lot of memories. But the....
Scanned photo of drawings of veterans cleaning rifle

Veterans Day Tribute – Excerpts from “Biffontaine”

Susan Nunes Published with Permission Sketches by Ryo Shinoda Editor’s note: In observance of Veterans Day, we are pleased to share with you this excerpt from writer Susan Nunes’ short story, “Biffontaine.” It is part of her collection of short stories titled “Paradise Café: A Family Memoir in Stories.” Nunes is a Hilo native who....
Dr. Amy Starecheski, director of Columbia University’s Oral History Master of Arts Program, leads a half-day workshop as part of UH Mänoa’s Center for Oral History relaunch event. (Photos courtesy UH Center for Oral History)

History – Connecting Past, Present, and Future

Kevin Y. Kawamoto Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The University of Hawai‘i’s Center for Oral History on the Mänoa campus is open for business once again, and longtime Ethnic Studies Professor Davianna Pömaika‘ºi McGregor has stepped up to serve as the center’s new director. McGregor was among the early supporters of the Ethnic Studies Oral....

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