Soon-to-be emperor and empress, Naruhito and his wife Masako, greet an elderly woman. (Courtesy of Hawaii Hochi)

The Chrysanthemum Throne – From Hirohito to Akihito to Naruhito

Each Generation Brings Change to the Chrysanthemum Throne Kevin Y. Kawamoto Special to The Hawai‘i Herald When Emperor Akihito was born on Dec. 23, 1933, in Tökyö, his father, Emperor Hirohito, announced that his first son would be called Prince Tsugu-no-Miya — Prince Tsugu, for short. The naming was in keeping with the Japanese imperial....

Lead Story – Recalling Iolani Palace’s Return to Glory

Fifty years ago, all of Hawai‘i state government’s elected big shots — from then-Gov. John Burns and his lieutenant governor, Tom Gill, to state senators and representatives — closed their ‘Iolani Palace offices and walked across what was then Hotel Street to America’s newest state capitol building. As they walked into Hawai‘i’s political and governmental....
Mae Nishioka and Pearl Yamaguchi in 2012 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel at the chartering of the Society of Women Engineers Hawaiian Islands Chapter. (Photo courtesy Pearl Yamaguchi)

Women’s History Month – Mae Nishioka, An Engineering Trailblazer

Scholarship Fundraising Drive Underway to Honor the Engineering Pioneer Kristen Nemoto Jay Special to The Hawai‘i Herald As we observe Women’s History Month, we shine the spotlight on a humble and quiet woman who inspired other women like her to chase their dreams. It’s been a while since Susan Nishioka flipped through the pages of....
Black and white photo of three Japanese American boys in Manzanar Relocation Center by Prolific California Photographer, Toyo Miyatake

“Toyo: Behind the Glass Eye” Exhibit

WHO/WHAT: The Nisei Veterans Memorial Center will present the Hawai‘i premiere of “TOYO: Behind the Glass Eye,” an exhibition of photographs by the prolific California photographer Toyo Miyatake. An issei from Kagawa Prefecture, he...
Benten Kozo (Takeo Miji) and Princess Senju (Joyce Yoshizu) in a scene from “Benten the Thief.”

Lead Story – Kabuki in Hawaii: A 50-Year Journey

Dance Sensei Shares Memories of Kennedy Theatre’s First Kabuki Performance Jodie Chiemi Ching The last time Hawai‘i residents were treated to an authentic kabuki performance from Japan was half a century ago, in December of 1963. So, fans of the centuries-old theatre art are probably counting down the days until March 2 when kabuki returns....
Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shöken, are featured in this print by Hashimoto Chikanobu (1838-1912). It commemorates the first time a Japanese emperor attended a kabuki play and was publicized in order to help resuscitate the art of kabuki, which, along with other traditional arts, was dying due to rapid Westernization. (Courtesy Honolulu Museum of Arts, Anonymous gift)

Art Review – Changing Times

Exhibit Celebrates 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration and Immigration to Hawai‘i Wayne Muromoto Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald In the “I Ching,” there is a popular canard, or myth: In crisis or change, there is opportunity. This is based on a false and superficial reading of the Chinese characters, or hanji (in Japanese:....
Irene Hirano Inouye

Gannenmono Symposium Keynote – Irene Hirano Inouye

"Like the Gannenmono . . . Be Bold and Adventurous As We Chart New Pathways Forward" Irene Hirano Inouye Published with Permission Aloha . . . I am very pleased to join the distinguished speakers and special guests at this historic Gannenmono commemoration. We are especially honored that Their Imperial Highnesses Prince and Princess Akishino....
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano

Gannenmono Symposium – Akemi Kikumura, Yano, PH.D.

"Why Hawaii's and the U.S. Mainland's Immigration Experiences Were So Different" Dr. Akemi Kikumura Yano Published with Permission How did the Mainland experience of Japanese immigrants and, subsequently, Japanese Americans, compare with that of the Gannenmono and later generations of Japanese in Hawai‘i? This is a question I am frequently asked and one that I....
Professor Masako Iino

Gannenmono Symposium – Masako Iino, PH.D.

"Gannenmono Spirit and Hawaii-Japan Relations" Professor Masako Iino Published with Permission Hawai‘i is one of the most popular destinations for Japanese tourists. When they fly into Honolulu, the first thing they notice is that the airport has a name: the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport. He was the first Japanese American to serve in the....

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