Clement Hanami, Vice President of exhibits and art director for the Japanese American National Museum in a reconstructed barracks building from the Heart Mountain Relocation Camp in Wyoming. The structure was reconstructed in the museum building.

Living History – Los Angeles’ Historic Little Tokyo

An American Story is Being Told Daily in Los Angeles’ Little Tokyo District Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald As the summer sky slowly turned a shade of pale orange, the near-capacity crowd of 58,000 in Dodger Stadium saluted a 94-year-old American veteran of Japanese and Hispanic ancestries who served in the 442nd....
Photo from 'Voices behind barbed wire: stories of Hawaii' promoting free screening by AARP Hawaii at the JCCH

“Voices Behind Barbed Wire: Stories of Hawaii” Screening

WHO/WHAT: AARP Hawai‘i will host a free screening of “Voices Behind Barbed Wire: Stories of Hawai‘i,” produced by the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. While the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans on the U.S....

Hidden HIstory – PETS IN CAMP

Dogs, Cats, Canaries and “Even a Badger” Brian Niiya Republished with Permission Aug. 26, 2020, Denshö Blog It is one of the most poignant — and often told — stories of the World War II roundup and incarceration...
Go for Broke Monument

Bulletin Board – Go for Broke Monument’s 1srt Streamed Anniversary Celebration

WHO/WHAT: The Go For Broke National Education Center will hold the 21st anniversary of its Go For Broke Monument via streaming services. The moving ceremony features keynote Kisa Ito, granddaughter of 442nd RCT veteran...
Dr. Mark McNally

Gannenmono Symposium – Dr. Mark McNally

History of the Gannenmono: "Should Server to Inspire Us Even Today" Dr. Mark McNally Published with Permission On June 19, 1868, the first group of Japanese immigrants arrived in Honolulu. Their group consisted of about 150 people, all of whom were adult men with the exception of five (or six) women who had accompanied their....
The Hawaii Herald Logo

MEET THE HERALD’S FREELANCE WRITERS

My name is Scott Baba. I’ve been a freelance writer for The Hawai‘i Herald since 2020. I have been an active member of the Japanese American community my entire life, and while I wouldn’t...
Students from Hiroshima Minami High School delivered a message of peace to the audience in English. (Photos by Jodie Ching)

Commemorations – Hiroshima, Nagasaki Atomic Bombings Remembered

Kacie Yamamoto Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Seventy-four years after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which ended World War II, calls for world peace and the preservation of humanity were front and center at anniversary commemorations in Honolulu and in cities around the world for both bombings. Approximately 140,000 people were killed on....

Honoring the Legacy – RYAN KAWAMOTO

Telling the AJA Story through Video Melvin Inamasu and Violet Harada Courtesy: Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i Editor’s note: This bimonthly series, “Honoring the Legacy,” represents a partnership between the Herald and the Japanese Cultural Center of...
Honolulu Japanese American Citizens League board with Gov. John Waihe‘e. From left: Rep. Roland Kotani, Rep. Nobu Yonamine, Bill Kaneko, Earl Nishimura (Honolulu JACL founder), Dolly Strazar, June Shimokawa, Franklin Odo, Allicyn Tasaka, Rep. Tom Okamura and Dan Ishii.

WILLIAM KANEKO

Advocate for Japanese Community Locally and Nationally Melvin Inamasu and Violet Harada Courtesy: Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i Editor’s Note: This bimonthly series represents a partnership between the Herald and the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i. It celebrates...
Emperor Meiji and his wife, Empress Shöken, are featured in this print by Hashimoto Chikanobu (1838-1912). It commemorates the first time a Japanese emperor attended a kabuki play and was publicized in order to help resuscitate the art of kabuki, which, along with other traditional arts, was dying due to rapid Westernization. (Courtesy Honolulu Museum of Arts, Anonymous gift)

Art Review – Changing Times

Exhibit Celebrates 150th Anniversary of the Meiji Restoration and Immigration to Hawai‘i Wayne Muromoto Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald In the “I Ching,” there is a popular canard, or myth: In crisis or change, there is opportunity. This is based on a false and superficial reading of the Chinese characters, or hanji (in Japanese:....

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