Mae Nishioka and Pearl Yamaguchi in 2012 at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel at the chartering of the Society of Women Engineers Hawaiian Islands Chapter. (Photo courtesy Pearl Yamaguchi)

Women’s History Month – Mae Nishioka, An Engineering Trailblazer

Scholarship Fundraising Drive Underway to Honor the Engineering Pioneer Kristen Nemoto Jay Special to The Hawai‘i Herald As we observe Women’s History Month, we shine the spotlight on a humble and quiet woman who inspired other women like her to chase their dreams. It’s been a while since Susan Nishioka flipped through the pages of....
Benten Kozo (Takeo Miji) and Princess Senju (Joyce Yoshizu) in a scene from “Benten the Thief.”

Lead Story – Kabuki in Hawaii: A 50-Year Journey

Dance Sensei Shares Memories of Kennedy Theatre’s First Kabuki Performance Jodie Chiemi Ching The last time Hawai‘i residents were treated to an authentic kabuki performance from Japan was half a century ago, in December of 1963. So, fans of the centuries-old theatre art are probably counting down the days until March 2 when kabuki returns....

Lead Story – Recalling Iolani Palace’s Return to Glory

Fifty years ago, all of Hawai‘i state government’s elected big shots — from then-Gov. John Burns and his lieutenant governor, Tom Gill, to state senators and representatives — closed their ‘Iolani Palace offices and walked across what was then Hotel Street to America’s newest state capitol building. As they walked into Hawai‘i’s political and governmental....
Professor Jonathan Okamura contends that serious legal questions can be raised about Myles Fukunaga’s sanity at the time he murdered young Gill Jamieson. (Courtesy Oahu Community Correctional Center)

History – Raced to Death: The Case of Myles Fukunaga

A Look Back on the Case That Rocked the AJA Community 90 Years Ago Jonathan Y. Okamura Commentary Special to The Hawai‘i Herald This year — Sept. 18, to be exact — marks 90 years since Myles Yutaka Fukunaga, a 19-year-old Nisei, killed Gill Jamieson, a 10-year-old Punahou student in Waikïkï. In a highly publicized....
“. . . I’m interested in preserving memorabilia, preserving the past . . .” says Colin Yamamoto standing beside one of the glass cases containing various antiques and memorabilia.

Preserving Maui’s Yesteryears

For Colin Yamamoto, They are All Historical Treasures Melissa Tanji Special to The Hawai‘i Herald A seat belt from Aloha Airlines Flight 243, a car speaker from the old Kahului Drive-In, plantation kaukau tins, handmade potato peelers and vegetable graters from the 1930s and ’40s. These pieces from Maui’s past are just a fraction of....
“We must rethink how we defend ourselves from the increasingly sophisticated and capable enemy cyber advances.” — Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone in a July 2016 panel hosted by the Association of the United States Army.

Lead Story – Lt. Gen. Paul Nakasone Nominated For Fourth Star

Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald Lt. Gen. Paul M. Nakasone, whose paternal grandmother immigrated to Hawai‘i as a picture bride and whose father witnessed the start of America’s war with Japan from the kitchen window of his family’s Wahiawä home and went on to serve in the predominantly Nisei Military Intelligence Service....
Art items that Haru Tanaka created in camp

In Their Own Words – “But I Believed in America”, The Voice of Haru...

Gail Honda Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The following interview write-up is the third of seven that will be published in The Hawai‘i Herald this year. It is part of a series titled, “In Their Own Words.” In the spring of 1980, I had the opportunity to interview seven former internees of Honouliuli Internment Camp....
In 2014, Army investigators sift through the remains of what was a prisoner of war camp at Schofield Barracks from 1944 to 1945. (U.S. Army photo)

History – Footprint of Hawaii’s Italian POW’s

The Little-Known Story of the Landmarks Left by World War II Italian Prisoners of War Gregg K. Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald During World War II, some 3,000 Okinawan soldiers, conscripts and civilians were imprisoned in Hawai‘i as prisoners of war. Twelve of them died while in captivity here in Hawai‘i and were buried....
June Arakawa was one of the first members of Hui O Laulima when it organized in 1968. Arakawa is pictured with a cultural display organized by Hui O Laulima at the then-Honolulu Academy of Arts. (Hawai‘i Herald Archives)

Community – Hui O Laulima to Celebrate its 50th With “Kanaganatu”

Hui O Laulima to Retrace Its Journey from “Auxiliary” to “We Can Do It! They were just supposed to help their husbands entertain visiting dignitaries from Okinawa by serving ocha (tea) and snacks, help the men organize dinners, and sit beside their husbands and smile . . . But something happened along the way. If....

Review – A Powerful “Allegiance”

Jodie Chiemi Ching Commentary Because I am a writer for The Hawai‘i Herald and an Okinawan performing artist, people might think that I’m the type of mother who forces my two sons, 14-year-old Gavin and 12-year-old Cameron, to attend or participate in Japanese and Okinawan cultural activities. Actually, I rarely do. I try to encourage....

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