A portrait of Queen Lili‘uokalani, adorned with strands of crown flower, her majesty’s favorite blossom, rests on an easel at the front of the temple as Honpa Hongwanji ministers chant. (Photos by Kristen Nemoto Jay)

Lead Story – Queen Lili‘uokalani Honored at Honpa Hongwanji

The Queen’s May 1901 Visit to Hongwanji Temple is Remembered and Celebrated Kristen Nemoto Jay Special to The Hawai‘i Herald This past Nov. 11 marked 100 years since the passing of Hawai‘i’s last reigning monarch, the beloved Queen Lili‘uokalani. The anniversary of her passing and the legacy she left in stories, her music, and in....

Cultural Tent – “Shīsā”

The Hui O Laulima women’s group is once again organizing the festival’s Cultural Tent, with Tina Kaneshiro and Laura Ajimine serving as co-chairs. The group selected “Shīsā” as the theme for this year’s Cultural...

Lead Story – Okinawan Festival, Still Thinking Big

Hawai‘i’s Largest Ethnic Festival is Moving to the Hawai‘i Convention Center Gregg Kakesako Special to The Hawai‘i Herald The birth of the state’s largest ethnic festival — the Okinawan Festival — on Labor Day weekend can be traced to 1980 and a concerted effort by a group of Sansei Uchinanchu leaders to perpetuate and share....
Photo of the Cherry Blossom Festival Queen Contestants

Cherry Blossom Festival Queen Contestants (p. 1 of 4)

Jennifer Keiko Ezaki Parents: Bruce and Laura Ezaki High School: Our Redeemer Lutheran, 2009 College/Degree/Year: Biola University, bachelor’s degree in communication, 2013; University of Hawai‘i at Mänoa, post baccalaureate certification in special education, 2016. “What does kokoro mean to you?” “Kokoro is a reminder for me to remain present and connected in a constantly changing....

2014 Okinawan Festival

Saturday's Program | Sunday's Program Cultural Tent | Festival Favorites 9 a.m. KILAUEA OKINAWA DANCE CLUB Toshiko Neumann, Leader 9:15 a.m. NUUANU OKINAWA SHORIN-RYU / SHINDEN-RYU KARATE ASSOCIATION Mitchel Shimamura, Sensei 9:40 a.m. HAWAII OKINAWA CREATIVE ARTS Jon Itomura, President, and Eric Nitta, Vice President 10:10 a.m. HUOA...

Okinawan Festival Favorites

ALL-TIME FAVORITES! Pig’s Feet Soup: It’s called ashitibichi in Uchinaaguchi (Okinawan language). Pieces of pig’s feet are cooked in a soup stock and garnished with konbu (seaweed), daikon (turnip), togan (squash) and mustard cabbage and...

Book on “Sugihara Survivors” Published in English

TÖKYÖ — A former official of the Japan National Tourism Organization has released an English-language version of his research on the wartime escape of Jews from Nazi persecution via Japan. Akira Kitade, 70, published his...

Maui Matsuri: For The Sake Of The Keiki

“Dis wen happen long, long time ago in Japan,” she starts in a low voice as the sun begins to set over the West Maui Mountains. About 400 people from 8 to 80 years...
Photo of the three sister courts gathering for a group photo while attending the 76th Nisei Week coronation in Los Angeles.

Cherry Blossom Festival Special – Queen Interview

Alexis Sayuri Okihara 64th Cherry Blossom Festival Queen Looks Forward to Sharing Knowledge with Future Generations Gwen Battad Ishikawa It is fitting that kansha (gratitude) was the theme of the 64th Cherry Blossom Festival, because kansha is what Queen Alexis Okihara has felt for the past year. “They [Honolulu Japanese Junior Chamber of Commerce, who....
The Gannenmono descendants during the “Talk Story” session. They were (from left): Carol Kondo, yonsei descendant of Bunkichi Murata; Ruth Izawa, sansei descendant of Yonekichi Sakuma; Haunani Jo-quin, fifth-generation descendant of Sentarö Ishii; Keone Cook, yonsei descendant, and Cathy West Dale, fifth-generation descendant of Matsugorö Kuwata (nicknamed “‘Umi‘umi-matsu” — ‘umi‘umi is Hawaiian language for beard, whiskers); and Gwen Sanchez, yonsei descendant, and Lily Kahele-lani Lyons, fifth-generation descendant of Tokujiro Sato.

Lead Story – Gannenmono Perspectives

The Gannenmono’s Legacy is Considered 150 Years After Their Arrival Jodie Chiemi Ching Insight into the history of one of Hawai‘i’s most visible ethnic groups — the Japanese — took a giant step forward last week with the events commemorating 150 years since the first group of immigrants arrived in Hawai‘i from Japan. The approximately....

Recent Posts

Purchase Culture4Kids!

- Advertisement -